Kavinace by neuroscience Kavinace by neuroscience

$ 50.00

Contains a blend of ingredients involved in the synthesis and activity of GABA, a neurotransmitter important for sleep*

GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, meaning its central role is to balance excitability of neurons (1). Because of its function, GABA is important for promoting sleep, calm, and managing stress (2-4). Stress is thought to alter GABA synthesis and activity by affecting the expression of GABA-synthesizing enzymes and receptors (5).

Ingredients such as taurine and vitamin B6 are important for glutamate-GABA balance.* High glutamate can damage neurons, alter cellular homeostasis, and cause mitochondrial dysfunction, which can ultimately lead to cell death (6). Taurine demonstrates GABA-A agonist activity and protects neurons and mitochondria against glutamate-induced damage (6, 7).* Active form of vitamin B6 is important for the synthesis of GABA as it is a required cofactor for glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme responsible for converting glutamate to GABA (8-10).*

References:

  1. Gou Z, et al. Dongwuxue Yanjiu. 2012;33(E5-6):E75-81.
  2. Mohler H. Neuropharmacology. 2012;62(1):42-53.
  3. Saper C, et al. Nature. 2005;437(7063):1257-63.
  4. Mody I and Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2012;6:4.
  5. Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2014;8:157.
  6. Ye H, et al. Can J Neurol Sci. 2013;40(5):628-34.
  7. Kletke O, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e61733.
  8. Rowley N, et al. Neurochem Int. 2012;61(4):546-58.
  9. Martin D. Cell Mol Neurobiol. 1987;7(3):237-53.
  10. Mukherjee T, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2011;1814(11):1585-96.

Contains a blend of ingredients involved in the synthesis and activity of GABA, a neurotransmitter important for sleep*

GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, meaning its central role is to balance excitability of neurons (1). Because of its function, GABA is important for promoting sleep, calm, and managing stress (2-4). Stress is thought to alter GABA synthesis and activity by affecting the expression of GABA-synthesizing enzymes and receptors (5).

Ingredients such as taurine and vitamin B6 are important for glutamate-GABA balance.* High glutamate can damage neurons, alter cellular homeostasis, and cause mitochondrial dysfunction, which can ultimately lead to cell death (6). Taurine demonstrates GABA-A agonist activity and protects neurons and mitochondria against glutamate-induced damage (6, 7).* Active form of vitamin B6 is important for the synthesis of GABA as it is a required cofactor for glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme responsible for converting glutamate to GABA (8-10).*

References:

  1. Gou Z, et al. Dongwuxue Yanjiu. 2012;33(E5-6):E75-81.
  2. Mohler H. Neuropharmacology. 2012;62(1):42-53.
  3. Saper C, et al. Nature. 2005;437(7063):1257-63.
  4. Mody I and Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2012;6:4.
  5. Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2014;8:157.
  6. Ye H, et al. Can J Neurol Sci. 2013;40(5):628-34.
  7. Kletke O, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e61733.
  8. Rowley N, et al. Neurochem Int. 2012;61(4):546-58.
  9. Martin D. Cell Mol Neurobiol. 1987;7(3):237-53.
  10. Mukherjee T, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2011;1814(11):1585-96.
Availability: 10 In Stock
Sku: 490

Contains a blend of ingredients involved in the synthesis and activity of GABA, a neurotransmitter important for sleep*

GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, meaning its central role is to balance excitability of neurons (1). Because of its function, GABA is important for promoting sleep, calm, and managing stress (2-4). Stress is thought to alter GABA synthesis and activity by affecting the expression of GABA-synthesizing enzymes and receptors (5).

Ingredients such as taurine and vitamin B6 are important for glutamate-GABA balance.* High glutamate can damage neurons, alter cellular homeostasis, and cause mitochondrial dysfunction, which can ultimately lead to cell death (6). Taurine demonstrates GABA-A agonist activity and protects neurons and mitochondria against glutamate-induced damage (6, 7).* Active form of vitamin B6 is important for the synthesis of GABA as it is a required cofactor for glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme responsible for converting glutamate to GABA (8-10).*

References:

  1. Gou Z, et al. Dongwuxue Yanjiu. 2012;33(E5-6):E75-81.
  2. Mohler H. Neuropharmacology. 2012;62(1):42-53.
  3. Saper C, et al. Nature. 2005;437(7063):1257-63.
  4. Mody I and Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2012;6:4.
  5. Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2014;8:157.
  6. Ye H, et al. Can J Neurol Sci. 2013;40(5):628-34.
  7. Kletke O, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e61733.
  8. Rowley N, et al. Neurochem Int. 2012;61(4):546-58.
  9. Martin D. Cell Mol Neurobiol. 1987;7(3):237-53.
  10. Mukherjee T, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2011;1814(11):1585-96.

Contains a blend of ingredients involved in the synthesis and activity of GABA, a neurotransmitter important for sleep*

GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, meaning its central role is to balance excitability of neurons (1). Because of its function, GABA is important for promoting sleep, calm, and managing stress (2-4). Stress is thought to alter GABA synthesis and activity by affecting the expression of GABA-synthesizing enzymes and receptors (5).

Ingredients such as taurine and vitamin B6 are important for glutamate-GABA balance.* High glutamate can damage neurons, alter cellular homeostasis, and cause mitochondrial dysfunction, which can ultimately lead to cell death (6). Taurine demonstrates GABA-A agonist activity and protects neurons and mitochondria against glutamate-induced damage (6, 7).* Active form of vitamin B6 is important for the synthesis of GABA as it is a required cofactor for glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme responsible for converting glutamate to GABA (8-10).*

References:

  1. Gou Z, et al. Dongwuxue Yanjiu. 2012;33(E5-6):E75-81.
  2. Mohler H. Neuropharmacology. 2012;62(1):42-53.
  3. Saper C, et al. Nature. 2005;437(7063):1257-63.
  4. Mody I and Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2012;6:4.
  5. Maguire J. Front Cell Neurosci. 2014;8:157.
  6. Ye H, et al. Can J Neurol Sci. 2013;40(5):628-34.
  7. Kletke O, et al. PLoS One. 2013;8(4):e61733.
  8. Rowley N, et al. Neurochem Int. 2012;61(4):546-58.
  9. Martin D. Cell Mol Neurobiol. 1987;7(3):237-53.
  10. Mukherjee T, et al. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2011;1814(11):1585-96.

Shipping & Returns

All In-stock items usually ship within 1-2 business days. Any orders placed on items on backorders are shipped in 3-5 business days. Hassle-Free Returns In order to return merchandise, you must obtain an RMA number from parib1950@gmail.com. You may return any unopened merchandise in its original condition, including original packaging and packing slip within 30 days of receipt and you will receive a full refund less shipping and any gift wrapping charges. We charge a 20% restocking fee for any merchandise not returned in its original condition and packaging. Any shipping cost you incur to return the product to us will not be refunded. Shipping cost is non-refundable for undelivered, unclaimed or returned packages, unless we made an error..

Shipping & Returns

All In-stock items usually ship within 1-2 business days. Any orders placed on items on backorders are shipped in 3-5 business days. Hassle-Free Returns In order to return merchandise, you must obtain an RMA number from parib1950@gmail.com. You may return any unopened merchandise in its original condition, including original packaging and packing slip within 30 days of receipt and you will receive a full refund less shipping and any gift wrapping charges. We charge a 20% restocking fee for any merchandise not returned in its original condition and packaging. Any shipping cost you incur to return the product to us will not be refunded. Shipping cost is non-refundable for undelivered, unclaimed or returned packages, unless we made an error..
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